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the nickname of downtown scotty brown. then to law school, the army national guard, city and state political office where he was one of just five republicans in a body of 40 in the state senate, and then the u.s. senate. senator brown also famously found time to do a little modeling in his youth and it was through this work that he met his wife gail. i've had the pleasure to get to know scott and gail really well over the last three years. they have two daughters and make an absolutely wonderful family. i'm sure gail, hyla and arianna are very, very proud of scott and just as proud as i am to see his tenure here cut short but they should be proud of the fact that scott has accomplished a lot in three short years here in the senate. he led the charge to repeal a burdensome withholding tax that hurt small businesses, he crafted legislation for crowdfunding which allows job creators to raise start-up funds for their businesses over the internet with less red tape and he introduced legislation to ensure that children's hospitals have access to discounts on orphan drugs that are used to treat rar
city of kansas in my home state. officer jeff athalate fatally shot while on duty, investigating drug activity occurring inside a vehicle outside a neighborhood grocery store. as they approached the vehicle and orbded the okay -- ordered the occupants to get out the gunmen took the lives of both officers. when we lose someone in a community in kansas, it's not just a name. it's somebody we go to church with. it's somebody we know and care about. these individuals are that to their friends and family in topeka and across our state. david had been part of the topeka police department for 21 years. he spent 13 years as a reserve officer and 8 years as a full-time officer. his service tkphot begin as a police officer. he served in the kansas national guard and recently retired. police chief ronald miller described david as someone who served his life to his country and to the city of tow pea kafplt david's service was a model to others including his son brandon who followed his dad's footsteps and served the topeka community as a police officer himself. the second officer -- jeff -- was 2
has made a request. yes, is it a hefty $60 billion? but look at who was hit -- a big city that's the heart -- one of the heartbeats of america: new york. and a little community like crisfield. now matter h.j. you live in -- but no matter whether you live in new york city or in crisfield, maryland, you deserve the help of your government. and i say to my colleagues, let's think of the people we were sent here to represent. we weren't sent here to represent a bottom line. we were here to represent people. and i would hope that we would put into place -- that we would pass the president's request. we have great policies that were arrived at. and if you really want to honor senator inouye, let's honor the way his own code of conduct -- a gentle way, a civil way, a consensus builder, a bipartisan builder, and a worker to move this bill. senator inouye chaired the full committee on aeption pros these -- on appropriations these last couple of years. his own staff shared a story with me. and it is relative with me here. he said, i chair the defense committee -- subcommittee,ances and t
a tremendous amount of damage. terror attacks such as 9/11, oklahoma city, in this case hurricanes -- and we've had a number of those. katrina stands in our minds, but irene and on and on it goes -- sandy being the latest. and this one was truly of monumental proportion and create add lot of damage. and, therefore, a federal response is needed and necessary, if we're going to begin to have an adequate recovery, get people back too work and back in their homes, businesses up and growing again and working. and the bill that is currently on the floor for us here attem attempts to do that. now, some of us were somewhat staggered by the initial number, $60.4 billion. that may not be enough. that may be too much. but in the short amount of time that we've had to try to put all the estimates together in terms of what might be needed, what we have -- senate republican appropriations members attempted to do is separate that from what is immediately needed -- immediate laid being from the time of the storm through march 27 -- to attend to those first responders, those initial responses that need to ta
ballooned since the 9/11 attacks. and you're looking at cities that have made up implausible scenarios for terrorist attacks. room to cut? >> guest: i think so, yeah. i'm not an expert in the homeland security area but i'm familiar with the general point and i agree when the federal government starts giving out grants like this, there's lots of room for abuse and made-up roles and made-up responsibilities to try to get federal money. i think that has taken place to some extent in that area and i would take a hard look cutting back. >> host: isabel sawhill, what are you hearing here? >> guest: no one can disagree with the idea we ought to make sure that the government has well-performing programs. i would give the current administration pretty high marks on worrying about that. they have a whole program in place to evaluate programs and where the evidence suggests they're not working, they are trying to cut back or else reform the programs. let me give you an example, the head start program, very popular program, that put use, used as federal money to serve three and 4-year-old kids fro
. what has this city never been able to get the arms around the level of fraud and abuse. what does it say for the expansion of government-one programs? >> well, the fact is that it's expensive to weed out the waste fraud and abuse. it takes an awful lot of government time and money put in to eliminating it. i think it's worth doing it. i don't think we do it nearly enough because if you stop it, and slow it down, then gradually you can retract the government requirement to weed it out. you get rid of it you don't have to pay as much to keep it out as you do to get out, in my opinion. it's been something -- government at times is wasteful in what it doesn't do as much as it is in what it does do. it's never rise tonight top level as i think it should, and hope it does. now one of the reasons i didn't want a government - run option as part of the health care bill because that would have been, in my opinion, a dumping ground for a government program to provide insurance and move away from the private market. i believe in private market for insurance. there's some cases where people ar
this city was unacceptable to him, and he made that clear to all of us. danny's focus was on people, on the infrastructure that they depend on in their communities, on the most vulnerable, on our military families, and on the state of hawaii. mr. president, if danny inouye was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without danny inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored, and he made it a better place to live and work for george bush reagan administrations to come. -- for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from another state far from washington, d.c., i learned a lot from senator inouye about how to advocate for the people who elect you and how to make sure they never get lost here in the mix. through his quiet and shining example, we all earn willed a bit -- we all learned a bit more about bipartisan. i so remember danny huddling on the floor working closely with his good friend, senator stevens from alaska. we all learned a bit more about effectiveness. he knew how to get things done. we all learn
. intercity passenger rail is already stimulating development on the corridor in cities like normal illinois where new multimodal station has attracted $200 million in related private investment and in joliet where construction of a new multi-mobile station is under way. plans also include new or improved stations were six other cities on backorder. we have greater 250 new jobs in rochelle illinois where rail cars are for california and the midwest are being built. last week i was able to witness -- that manufacture the notice to proceed. illinois in the midwest collaboration on high-speed rail began in 1980, but gained attractions in the '90s when a 10 state midwest regional -- regional rail initiative a joint study and prepared a stamp -- plan to upgrade existing track, and passenger rail frequencies and use new technologies to enable faster, safer passenger trains on all of our existing rail corridors. with years of solid planning in place, illinois and its midwest partners were ready to move quickly on april 16 in 2009 when president obama called for a national network of connected high-
challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their presence. such also exacerbate fear there may be a conspiracy to breakout and to the civilian space rule out the hand of the pro-democracy forces within the country and for the work that is deeply invested in the space rule. many malians were proud of the country's democracy to consolidating the need by strengthening institutions and enhancing accountability and in the intelligence of the coup it's now been superseded by the c
to overcome an object city national minority -- obstinate minority. cloture is needed, we're told, because members of the minority refuse to stop delaying. but does filing cloture hon a matter, be it a bill, amendment, or conference report, on the very same day the senate is considering that matter indicate a minority that is prolonging debate or does it indicate a majority that is eager not to have a debate at all? to me, a habitual effort to file cloture on a matter as soon as the senate begins to consider the matter indicates the latter. and what do the numbers show about the use of cloture by this democratic majority? according to c.r.s., the current senate majority has filed cloture on a amendmen a matter y same day it considered the matter three and a half more times than the senate republicans did it when they were in the majority. the current democratic majority has done so well over 100 times. to put it another way, senate democrats are much more apt to try to shut off debate on a matter as soon as the senate begins to consider a matter than were previous majorities, including mo
big state government. we have lots of little localities. take long beach, a city of 35,000 gone, wiped out, basically. if they had to come up with 35% of the project, it would be hopeless. now, katrina got 100%. we're not even asking for that. but the 90% that has traditionally been given to army corps projects when the damage is so large that it has realized that the locality cannot pay for it alone makes imminent sense. the village of lindenhurst, the village of massapequa, the villages on fire island all do not have the wherewithal. if we were to say and pass the senator from oklahoma's amendment, we get no army corps relief. and then when storms much smaller than sandy came, we would be wiped out again. so it doesn't make sense. the storm beach damage reduction project in long beach, for instance, has a local cost share of $35 million. that's more than a quarter of the entire city's annual budget. if they had to pay their share, it wouldn't get built. same thing, take a little vote -- take a little small village of asheroken which was terribly damaged. again, in the past, when ther
would happen if a nuclear explosion went off in new york city so everything has to be done to prevent it it's a breeding ground for the terrorists and they do it, and as time goes on, they become more technically capable which in the past has been one of the stumbling blocks when we worked on this in the task force there were not many that could even think about building a nuclear weapon. that unfortunately is changing. >> julia was giving me the death stair which means that our time is up. i want to tell you that after you are working is happening with the hands of such experts please give them a round of applause. [applause] more now on how the budget price of the sequestration could affect the defense spending and national security. from washington journal, this is a little more than an hour. >> we are back. our conversation continues. gordon adams is the white house associate budget director for national security served from 1993 to 1997, and vice president of lexington institute here to give their perspective on sequestration and the impact on the pentagon. let's begin. what affe
in the great city of chicago at the knickerbocker hotel, he said. that was the hotel for officers. he said i would come into chicago and have a great time on the weekends and head back to the veterans hospital. well, he finally talked one of his fellow hawaiians, a man whose face had literally been burned off to join him on one of these trips to chicago. the man was embarrassed at his appearance and didn't think anyone would want to be around him or talk to him, but danny inouye made sure that when he came to chicago, he prepared all of these different places to stop. every one of them greeted senator inouye and his friend in a warm fashion. the story goes on from there, and i won't go into the details, but he was a man who always was looking to help someone else. he told how this man who had been so brutally injured in the war returned to hawaii and raised a family and was dan inouye's friend for life, as so many of us were. i think back as well about senator robert c. byrd's funeral in west virginia. mr. president, it was one of the hottest days i can remember. we were up there just baking
with two feet of snow and 60-mile-an-hour winds when a blizzard hammered the city. it caused 36 deaths, stranded 1,500 people on lake shore drive, which i go back and forth on every day and still find it hard to imagine, 1,500 people stuck on lake shore drive. it resulted in $3.9 billion in losses. april was the wettest april in 116 years in the midwest, forcing the mississippi and missouri rivers to flood thousands of square miles. this is 2011 i'm talking about. there were 326 tornadoes in may throughout the midwest and southern u.s., resulting in the deadliest may since 1933. wildfires burned 3 million acres of property across the western states, causing over a billion dollars in damages. and hurricane irene devastated the atlantic coast, causing $4.3 billion in damage. a very small amount compared to sandy but significant still for those affected. nationwide, the financial consequences of weather-related disasters and climate change hit an historic new high last year. u.s. disasters cost over $55 billion in damages. federal, state and local governments are paying out more every yea
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15